Home   Сontacts   Map  
    Add stuff    |    Information
Search:
Allergies [16]
Allergy is a disorder of the immune system often also referred to as atopy.
Antidepressants [21]
An antidepressant is a psychiatric medication used to alleviate mood disorders, such as major depression and dysthymia.
Arthritis [27]
Arthritis is a group of conditions involving damage to the joints of the body.
Cancer [24]
Cancer is a class of diseases in which a group of cells display uncontrolled growth
Cardio & Blood [6]
Risk factors for heart disease: infections
Cholesterol [16]
A fat-like substance called a lipid. It is used to build cell membranes, hormones and bile acids
Diabetes [26]
The inability of the body to produce, or the inability to metabolize, the human hormone insulin; Diabetes insipidus, usually a disorder of the ...
Epilepsy [22]
Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures
Gastrointestinal [9]
The digestive tract is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in food...
General Health [62]
The infant, child or young person?s current health condition
Herbal [25]
Herbal tea, herbal medicine
Hormonal [23]
Hormones - Proteins produced by organs of the body that trigger activity in other locations.
Men's Health [4]
For men on fitness, health, sex, caree
Pain relief [21]
Pain management is the medical discipline concerned with the relief of pain.
Skin care [28]
The skin is the outer covering of the body
Weight Loss [24]
Loss of body weight by dieting or due to various easting disorders or medical conditions.
Women's Health [25]
Find information on women's health issues, and lifestyle at the Women's Health


Fresh material
Male fertility tests: fructose, anti-sperm antibody and post-coital tests Male fertility tests: fructose, anti-sperm antibody and post-coital tests
→ More
Impotence: some preventable causes Impotence: some preventable causes
→ More
Skirting stds Skirting stds
→ More
Male fertility: why are so many sperm needed? Male fertility: why are so many sperm needed?
→ More
Factors that affect your fertility: recreational drugs Factors that affect your fertility: recreational drugs
→ More
The most popular materials
Breast lumps: dysplasia, fibroadenosis [2695 view]
Breast lumps: dysplasia, fibroadenosis → More
Male fertility tests: fructose, anti-sperm antibody and post-coital tests [1935 view]
Male fertility tests: fructose, anti-sperm antibody and post-coital tests → More
Male fertility: why are so many sperm needed? [1755 view]
Male fertility: why are so many sperm needed? → More
Factors that affect your fertility: recreational drugs [1603 view]
Factors that affect your fertility: recreational drugs → More
Symptoms of endometriosis: dysmenorrhoea and dyspareunia [1516 view]
Symptoms of endometriosis: dysmenorrhoea and dyspareunia → More


Awaiting moderation 401 Article

The g.i. factor: how much carbohydrate do you need in a day?

        THE G.I. FACTOR: HOW MUCH CARBOHYDRATE DO YOU NEED IN A DAY?
Most of the world's population eat a high carbohydrate diet based on staples such as rice, maize (corn), millet and wheat-based foods like pasta or bread. In developing countries, carbohydrate may form 70 to 80 per cent of a person's kilojoule intake. In developed countries the intake may be half this. In the United States and Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand, carbohydrate typically contributes only 40 to 45 per cent of kilojoule intake. In these countries, carbohydrate, the body's vital energy source, tends to be crowded out by fat.
Current recommendations suggest that we take at least 50 to 60 per cent of our total kilojoules as carbohydrate. To do this we need to consume 150 grams of carbohydrate for every 4200 kilojoules (1000 Calories). For a low kilojoule diet (5000 kilojoules/1200 Calories) it means eating about 175 grams of carbohydrate per day (equivalent to about 12 slices of bread). A young, active person with higher energy requirements, say in the order of 8400 kilojoules (2000 Calories) would require 300 grams of carbohydrate (equivalent to about 20 slices of bread). As an example of what this looks like we have calculated a sample carbohydrate intake for small eaters and bigger eaters.
The number of kilojoules and hence the amount of carbohydrate needed varies greatly between people. Your kilojoule requirements depend on your age, sex, activity level and body size. It is not possible to publish standard figures that will apply to every reader. If you want more information on your own specific kilojoule and carbohydrate needs, we suggest that you consult a dietitian. Dietitians can help you assess your kilojoule requirements and calculate exactly how much carbohydrate you need. Most of us don't need to keep count of the number of grams of carbohydrate we eat every day. But for some people, like athletes, it may be necessary to keep a watch to make sure that they are eating enough carbohydrate.
However, if you are looking at ways to improve your own diet there are two important things to remember:
1. Identify the sources of fat and look at ways you can reduce it. Don't go overboard-the body needs some fat in the diet
2. Check whether you need to add more carbohydrate to your diet and eat more. Most people don't eat enough.
Note: A low-fat diet is not appropriate for children under five years of age. They need the extra energy provided by fat for normal growth and development.
How to find a dietitian. If you want to consult a dietitian about your kilojoule requirements and how much carbohydrate you need, look in the Yellow Pages under Dietitians. Make sure that the person you choose has the letters APD after their name (Accredited Practising Dietitian).

*16\33\4*


Print
Viewed: 580

What else is watching the people who read this article:
The g.i. factor: how does carbohydrate work? [615]
Emmett Mcclain [9]
Irvin Valentine [36]
Ralph England [51]
Diabetes in children: insulin injections. insulin antibodies [610]

Keywords for this page: The g.i. factor: how much carbohydrate do you need in a day?
Total 780 articles
Articles © ipeerx.com 2011